Pumpkin Patch Guide 2019

KING COUNTY

Baxter Barn
31929 SE 44th St, Fall City
Pumpkin patch, tractor-pulled hay rides, fresh eggs, gift shop, pony rides, picnic area, farm animals

Carpinito Brothers
1148 Central Ave N, Kent
Pumpkin patch, corn maze, farm fun yard, hay rides, produce stand, concessions

Fall City Farms
3636 Neal Road, Fall City
Pumpkin patch, tractor-pulled hay rides, fresh honey, pre-picked produce, farm animals, snacks and refreshments.

Fox Hollow Family Farm
12031 Issaquah Hobart Rd SE, Issaquah
Pumpkins for sale, hay bale maze, bouncy house, face painting, haunted house, pony rides, petting zoo, farm animals, concessions

Jubilee Farm
229 W Snoqualmie River Rd NE, Carnation
Pumpkins, horse-drawn covered wagon rides, hay rides, hay bale maze

Oxbow Farm
10819 Carnation-Duvall Rd NE, Carnation
Pumpkins, produce, picnic area, playground

Mosby Farm Pumpkin Patch
12747-b South East Green Valley Rd, Auburn
Pumpkin patch, corn maze, tractor-pulled hay rides, snacks and refreshment stand, picnic area

The Nursery at Mt Si
42328 SE 108th St, North Bend
Pumpkin patch, tractor-pulled hay rides

Remlinger Farms
32610 NE 32nd St, Carnation
Pumpkin patch, corn maze, animal barnyard, pony rides, steam train, hay jump

Serres Farm
20306 NE 50th St, Redmond
Pumpkin patch, corn maze, duck races, animal train

Thomasson Family Farm
38223 236th Ave SE, Enumclaw
Pumpkin patch, corn maze, kids korral, tractor train rides, pumpkin sling shot

Tonnemaker Valley Farm, Woodinville Farm Stand
16215 140th Pl NE, Woodinville
You-pick pumpkin patch, you-pick flowers, produce stand, on-site pepper roasting on Saturdays

 

SNOHOMISH COUNTY

Biringer’s Black Crow Pumpkins & Corn Maze
2431 Highway 530 NE, Arlington
Pumpkin patch, corn maze, straw or hay bale maze, tractor-pulled hay rides, farm market, picnic area

Bob’s Corn & Pumpkin Farm
10917 Elliott Rd, Snohomish
Pumpkin patch, corn maze, bonfire & picnic area, hay rides, pony rides, playground, concessions

Carleton Farm
630 Sunnyside Blvd SE, Lake Stevens
Pumpkin patch, train rides, corn maze, haunted corn maze, tractor-pulled hay rides, farm animals, farm market

Craven Farm
13817 Short School Rd, Snohomish
Pumpkin patch, corn maze, tractor-pulled hay rides, face painting, farm animals, snacks & refreshment stand

The Farm at Swans Trail
7301 Rivershore Rd, Snohomish
Pumpkin patch, corn maze, pick your own apples, pig & duck races, petting zoo, putt-putt golf and more

Fairbank Animal Farm & Pumpkin Patch
15308 52nd Ave W, Edmonds
Pumpkins, petting zoo, farm animals, picnic area

Fosters Pumpkin Farm
5818 State Route 530 NE, Arlington
Pumpkin patch, corn maze, hay bale maze, corn cannon, pre-picked produce, face painting, farm animals, snacks and refreshment stand, picnic area

Stocker Farms
8705 Marsh Rd, Snohomish
Pumpkin patch, corn maze, haunted corn maze, tractor-pulled hay rides, jumping pillow and more

Thomas Family Farm
9010 Marsh Road, Snohomish
Pumpkin patch, corn maze, monster truck rides, haunted house, gem mining, Zombie Safari Paintball Hayride, beer garden, putt-putt golf and more

 

PIERCE COUNTY

Double R Farms
5820 44th St E, Puyallup
Pumpkin patch, corn maze, hay rides, farm animals, pumpkin sling shot

Maris Farms
25001 Sumner-Buckley Hwy, Buckley
Pumpkin patch, corn maze, haunted woods, farm animals, hay ride, trout fishing, play ground

Picha’s Farm
6502 52nd St E, Puyallup
Pumpkin patch, corn maze, hay ride, pumpkin sling shot, concessions

Scholz Farm
12920 162nd Ave E, Orting
Pumpkin patch, corn maze, play area

Spooner Farms
9622 SR 162 E, Puyallup
Pumpkin patch, farm animals, face painting, pumpkin sling shot, concessions

Posted on August 22, 2019 at 6:48 pm
Becky and Steve Larsen | Category: Just for Fun

5 Real Estate Reality TV Myths Explained

Have you ever been flipping through the channels, only to find yourself glued to the couch in an HGTV binge session? We’ve all been there, watching entire seasons of shows like “Property Brothers,” “Fixer Upper,”and “Love It or List It,” all in one sitting.

When you’re in the middle of your real estate-themed TV show marathon, you might start to think everything you see on the screen must be how it works in real life. However, you may need a reality check.

Reality TV Show Myths vs. Real Life:

Myth #1: Buyers look at 3 homes and decide to purchase one of them.
Truth: There may be buyers who fall in love and buy the first home they see, but according to the National Association of Realtors, the average homebuyer tours 10 homes as a part of their search.  

Myth #2: The houses the buyers are touring are still for sale.
Truth: Everything is staged for TV. Many of the homes shown are already sold and are off the market. 

Myth #3: The buyers haven’t made a purchase decision yet.
Truth: Since there is no way to show the entire buying process in a 30-minute show, TV producers often choose buyers who are further along in the process and have already chosen a home to buy. 

Myth #4: If you list your home for sale, it will ALWAYS sell at the open house.
Truth: Of course, this would be great! Open houses are important to guarantee the most exposure to buyers in your area, but they are only one piece of the overall marketing of your home. Keep in mind, many homes are sold during regular showing appointments as well. 

Myth #5: Homeowners decide to sell their homes after a 5-minute conversation.
Truth: Similar to the buyers portrayed on the shows, many of the sellers have already spent hours deliberating the decision to list their homes and move on with their lives and goals.

Bottom Line

Having an experienced professional on your side while navigating the real estate market is the best way to guarantee you can make the home of your dreams a true reality.

 

KCM August 2019

 

Posted on August 14, 2019 at 6:43 pm
Becky and Steve Larsen | Category: Just for Fun

Refresh Your Home – Some Great Ideas

 

The craving to move happens to every homeowner as they start to feel bogged down, or like they need a restart. That sense of newness doesn’t have to be dramatic, however. The great part about having a home of your own is you can make improvements and give your home a chance to evolve over time. You just need to help your home live up to its potential!  These are seven of our favorite improvements to help you make the most of your home.

 

1. Find Your Home’s Purpose

Each home is as unique as its owners, so in order to fully utilize your home, consider how you view your home’s purpose. Some people like to entertain, others find it a calm space in the frenzy of daily life; some nurture their families and others nurture their creativity. Your home’s purpose can be any combination of these and more, but it helps to consider the function of your space in order to ultimately find its purpose. Knowing your home’s purpose will help guide you as you move room to room while you refresh the space.

 

2. Assemble a List

 

Create a list of haves/needs/wants. Answer questions like: what is it about the space that isn’t working; how could it work better to fulfill the purpose; where could I move some of my items to make them feel new again?

 

3. Make an “Inspiration Board”

 

An “inspiration board” is a great way to visualize your home’s decor. You can create a board online with a tool like Pinterest to organize ideas you love, you can also use the ‘Save’ feature on Instagram, or the old-fashioned way with a cork board and magazines. Doing this will allow you to see all the elements you like in one place so that you can then tie it all together into a room you love.

 

Photo Credit: @Krista4Coral on Instagram

4. Choose a New Palate

Renew the lighting and color by shaking up your color palate. It’s easy to fall into the white/beige standby to keep our rooms neutral, but sometimes a color that provides a contrast to your décor will make the room pop. Add a new color to the palate, refresh a wall with an accent color that you already feature in your decor, or overhaul your curtains and throws with a brand new hue.
What about the Pantone color of the year? See our blog on how to incorporate Living Coral into your home.

 

5. Rearrange

Moving furniture around is another easy way to reinvent your space. Try placing your sofa on an angle to open up your entertaining room or move your lamps to improve lighting. You can also think about moving a piece of furniture into a room to give it new life, like using a unique dresser for a credenza or a chair as a side table.

 

Photo Credit: HouseBeautiful

 

6. Create a Collection

If you have items that you like to collect, think about how to transform that collection into something you can display. If you don’t already have a collection of loved objects think about what this collection would be for you. You can center a room design around your travel souvenirs, old camera collection, figurines, unique plates, or familial objects. Adding to this collection over time can be a great way to keep your spaces new while maintaining a personal feel to your decor.

 

7. Find Design Motivation

Home design evolves over time and can be sustained by finding items that inspire you. Read magazines and books that inspire your interests in architecture, design, art, etc. Or find stores and flea markets that sell pieces that influence your aesthetic. Another way to get in-tune and keep your aesthetic with you is to bring a camera with you when you’re doing your favorite activities and bring back memories or inspirations.

 

Note: Have fun with it! Homes and aesthetics evolve over time, add and subtract as you go, and don’t stress if the room doesn’t feel finished. You’ll get there eventually.

 

Posted on July 11, 2019 at 7:06 pm
Becky and Steve Larsen | Category: Helpful Information, Just for Fun

2019 Farmer’s Market’s

 

buy local smallWhen you shop at a local Farmers Market, you’re buying outstanding freshness, quality and flavor. Knowing exactly where your food comes from and how it was grown provides peace of mind for your family. Plus, you’re supporting a sustainable regional food system that helps small family farms stay in business; protects land from over-development, and provides the community with fresh, healthy food. Find one near you on the list below!

South Snohomish

Arlington Farmers Market
Legion Park: 200 N. Olympic Ave
Saturdays. 10am-3pm
June 1 — August 31

Bothell Park Ridge Community Market
Park Ridge Church: 3805 Maltby Road, Bothell
Wednesdays 4pm-8pm
June 5—September 25

Edmonds Garden Market
Historical Museum: 5th & Bell Street
Saturdays 9am-2pm
May 4—June 8

Edmonds Summer Market
Downtown: 5th St from the fountain
Saturdays 9am-3pm
June 15—October 5

Everett Farmers Markets
Boxcar Park: 615 13th Street
Sundays 11am-4pm
May 12—October 6

Everett Transit Center: 2333 32nd St
Wednesdays 4pm-8pm
June 5—August 28

Marysville Farmer’s Market
Location TBD
Saturdays 10am-2pm
June 22—August 31

Mill Creek Farmer’s Market
City Hall: 15720 Main St.
Tuesdays 3pm-7pm
June 18-August 20

Snohomish Farmers Market
Cedar Ave & Pearl St.
Thursdays 3pm-7pm
May 2—September 26

Eastside

Bellevue Farmers Market
First Presbyterian: 1717 Bellevue Way NE
Thursdays 3pm-7pm
May 16—October 10

Bellevue Crossroads Farmers Market
East Parking Lot: 15600 NE 8th St
Tuesdays 12pm-6pm
June 4—September 24

Issaquah Farmers Market
Pickering Barn: 1730 10th Ave NW
Saturdays 9am-2pm
May 4—September 28

Juanita Friday Market
Juanita Beach: 9703 NE Juanita Dr
Fridays 3pm-7pm
June 5—September 27

Kirkland Wednesday Market
Marina Park: 25 Lakeshore Plaza
Wednesdays 2pm-7pm
June 7—September 25

Mercer Island Farmers Market
Mercerdale Park: 7700 SE 32nd St
Sundays 10am-3pm
June 2—September 29

Redmond Saturday Market
Redmond Town Center: 7730 Leary Way NE
Saturdays 9am-3pm
May 4—October 26

Sammamish Farmers Market
City Hall Plaza: 801 228th Ave SE
Wednesdays 4pm-8pm
May 8—September 18

Woodinville Farmers Market
DeYoung Park: 13680 NE 175th St
Saturdays 9am-3pm
May 4—September 28

Seattle

Ballard Farmers Market
Ballard Ave NW
Sundays. 10am-3pm
YEAR ROUND

Capitol Hill Broadway Farmers Market
Seattle Central Comm College: Broadway & Pine
Sundays 11am-3pm
YEAR ROUND

Columbia City Farmers Market
37th Ave S & S Edmunds St
Wednesdays 3pm-7pm
May 8—October 9

Fremont Sunday Market
Corner of 3410 Evanston Ave N
Sundays 10am-4pm
YEAR ROUND

Lake City Farmers Market
125th St and 28th Ave NE
Thursdays 3pm-7pm
June 6—October 3

Lake Forest Park Farmers Market
Third Place Commons: 17171 Bothell Way NE
Sundays 10am-3pm
May 12—October 20

Madrona Farmers Market
1126 Martin Luther King Jr. Way
Fridays 3pm-7pm
May 17—October 11

Magnolia Farmers Market
Magnolia Village: 33rd Ave W & W McGraw
Saturdays. 10am-2pm
June 1—November 23

Phinney Farmers Market
Neighborhood Center: Phinney Ave N
Fridays 3:30pm-7:30pm
June 7—September 27

Pike Place Farmers Market
Pike Place & Pine St
Saturdays 9am-5pm
June 1—November 23

Queen Anne Farmers Market
W Crockett Street & Queen Anne Ave N
Thursdays 3pm-7:30pm
May 30—October 10

Shoreline Farmers Market
15300 Westminster Ave N
Saturdays 10am-3pm
June 8—October 5

University District Farmers Market
University Way NE “the Ave”
Saturdays 9am-2pm
YEAR ROUND

Wallingford Farmers Market
Meridian Park: Meridian Ave N & N 50th St
Wednesdays 3pm-7pm
May 15—September 25

West Seattle Farmers Market
California Ave SW & SW Alaska St
Sundays 10am-2pm
YEAR ROUND

 

Posted on April 26, 2019 at 12:45 am
Becky and Steve Larsen | Category: Just for Fun

When to Plant Your Veggies in the PNW

Growing your own vegetables is both fun and rewarding. It might seem intimidating if you’ve never done it before, but once you get started, you’ll discover that it isn’t very hard. Gardening is a learning experience, though. You’ll find that some things work better than others, and every planting season gives you another opportunity to make some tweaks and try again.

The first thing you need to decide is where to plant. For most veggies, this should be the sunniest spot you have. And of course the second big question is what to plant. Go for the things you love to eat, as well as plants that will thrive in the amount of sun you have.

Our climate in the Pacific Northwest requires some crops to be started indoors in the winter and transplanted outside in the spring. But it’s not too late to get started. There are lots of plants that you can sow directly into the garden in early spring. This graphic shows a few:

There are also many crops that can be planted in the summer for a fall harvest. Click here for a complete timeline of planting vegetables in the Seattle area.

Posted on March 25, 2019 at 6:43 pm
Becky and Steve Larsen | Category: Just for Fun

2019 Skagit Valley Tulip Festival

Here’s your guide to the  2019 Skagit Valley Tulip Festival!

Posted on March 24, 2019 at 8:36 pm
Becky and Steve Larsen | Category: Just for Fun, Local News

Washington in Bloom

Washington in Bloom: 12 Spring Hikes for Wildflowers

~Published by the Washington Trail Association – See their website for more information:  https://www.wta.org/go-outside/seasonal-hikes/spring-destinations/spring-wildflower-hikes

With their bright pops of color tucked into our green forests or scattered across our central scablands, wildflowers herald a warmer, sunnier hiking season. From marshy yellow skunk cabbage to unlikely glacier lilies, you can find early spring wildflowers all over the state this time of year.

In Washington, we have a wildflower season that lasts from March through August. With so many unique ecosystems right in our backyard, many incredible flowers have found their niche.

The rich variety of flora could have you hiking for decades and still finding new wonders on the forest floor. Early spring is the perfect time to stride out on trail to see big, showy balsamroot, delicate calypso orchids or bright salmonberry bushes in bloom.

Tips for wildflower hiking:

___________________________________________________________

SUGARLOAF

Location: Puget Sound & Islands – Bellingham area
Length:
 2.5 miles, roundtrip
Elevation Gain: 890 ft.

Sugarloaf by hikingwithlittledogs..jpeg

Wildflowers dot the hills of Sugarloaf. Photo by hikingwithlittledogs.

The network of trails on the Anacortes Community Forest Lands is extensive enough that you can spend all day hiking and exploring here. Keep your eyes peeled for camas and delicate avalanche lilies dotting the hillsides. Don’t forget to look up from your wildflower hunt every now and then to take in the views of the sound, too!

>> Read more about Sugarloaf in WTA’s Hiking Guide

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FIDALGO HEAD LOOP TRAIL

Location: Puget Sound & Islands – Bellingham area
Length: 4.0 miles, roundtrip
Elevation Gain: 300 ft.

Fidalgo Head Loop Trail by blueshirtBob.jpeg

Fidalgo Head Loop Trail. Photo by blueshirtBob.

All the benefits of an island hike, without the ferry ride (unless you’re starting on the islands, of course). While this trail is known more for it’s wildlife-watching opportunities, the hillside meadows and trees come into bloom in early spring. On a sunny day, this is a terrific spot for a short hike and a picnic. When it the spring clouds roll in, you’ll still have great views and a little more solitude.

>> Read more about Fidalgo Head in WTA’s Hiking Guide

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FOURTH OF JULY CREEK TO ICICLE RIDGE

Location: Central Cascades – Leavenworth
Length:
 12 miles, roundtrip
Elevation Gain: 4370 ft.

Icicle Ridge by TreeLady.jpeg

Flowers line the trail on the climb towards Icicle Ridge. Photo by TreeLady.

While there is often still snow on the upper reaches of this trail in spring, this popular destination outside of Leavenworth offers a riot of wildflower offerings. You’ll have a good chance at balsamroot or lupine, but keep your eyes peeled for the rarer delights as well: flowers like Tweedy’s Lewisa or Chocolate Lilies. Come back in a month or two for less snow and summer flowers.

>> Read more about Icicle Ridge in WTA’s Hiking Guide

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CHELAN LAKESHORE TRAIL

Location: Central Cascades — Entiat Mountains/Lake Chelan
Length:
 17 miles, one-way
Elevation Gain: 4030 ft.

Chelan Lakeshore Trail by jar.berg.jpeg

Chelan Lakeshore trail. Photo by jar.berg.

This early-season trail features craggy, snow-capped peaks, a sapphire-blue lake, wildflowers, as well as regular maintenance by WTA volunteers. The 17-mile thru-hike on the Chelan Lakeshore Trail will take you to the delightful and secluded town of Stehekin where you can take a quick tour of the valley via bus or bike or visit the Stehekin Pastry Company—two miles from the ferry dock.

>> Read more about the Chelan Lakeshore trail in WTA’s Hiking Guide

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KLICKITAT RAIL TRAIL – KLICKITAT RIVER

Location: Southwest – Columbia River Gorge
Length:
 10.5 miles, roundtrip
Elevation Gain: 200 ft.

Klickitat Rail Trail by Jarv..jpeg

Fragrant lilac, bouquets of lupine, popcorn flowers, balsamroot,and miner’s lettuce can all be found along a section of trail starting in Lyle. Photo by Jarv.

Hop aboard for an early-season wildflower bloom amid open terrain and open air. At a healthy clip or a slow meander, this rail trail is fun at any speed! The Klickitat Trail runs 31 miles, with multiple access points placed in unique areas, from grass plains and the rugged Swale Canyon along the Wild and Scenic Klickitat River, to oak-filled valleys dropping down to Lyle and the Klickitat’s mouth at the Columbia River.

>> Read more about Kickitat Trail in WTA’s Hiking Guide

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COLUMBIA HILLS STATE PARK

Location: Southwest – Columbia River Gorge
Length:
 12.4 miles (Horsethief Butte)
Elevation Gain: 1870 ft.

Phox and Balsamroot on the Crawfor Oaks trail. Photo by Bob and Barb.jpeg

Phox and balsamroot on the Crawford Oaks trail. Photo by Bob and Barb.

Climb gentle hills exploding with lupine, paintbrush, balsamroot and other wildflowers. Make it multi-day adventure by camping in the state park and hiking Crawford Oaks and The Dalles Mountain. Go prepared for ticks.

>> Read more about Columbia Hills in WTA’s Hiking Guide

>> Get more ideas for Columbia River Gorge spring hikes

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WHISKEY DICK WILDLIFE AREA

Location: Central Washington, near Yakima
Length:
 8.0 miles, roundtrip
Elevation Gain: 1750 ft.

Whiskey Dick Ridge by David Hagen.jpeg

Lupines blooming over the Whiskey Dick Ridge. Photo by David Hagen.

Wander among a wide variety of wildflowers—including a rare species of cactus, Simpson’s hedgehog, with its hot pink blossoms—chunks of petrified wood, and panoramic views of the Columbia Basin, under usually sunny, blue skies. Bring your camera and your field guide. For those hikers who prefer vistas or bird-watching to finding flora, there’s plenty of that to go around, too.

>> Read more about Whiskey Dick Wildlife Area in WTA’s Hiking Guide

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SNOW MOUNTAIN RANCH

Location: Central Washington, near Yakima
Length:
 9.2 miles (with shorter options)

Cacti blooming on Selah Butte. Photo by Natasha'n'Boris.jpeg

Cacti blooms at in spring. Photo by Natasha’n’Boris.

Head towards Yakima for some of the best wildflower shows in the state. Spend the day roaming on this former ranch, which in spring is cloaked in wildflowers! Keep your eyes peeled for the delightfully bright hedgehog cacti, bitterroot and more. If you want to make

>> Read more about Snow Mountain Ranch

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FROG LAKE

Location: Central Washington — Potholes Region
Length: 3.0 miles, roundtrip
Elevation Gain: 235 ft.

Frog Lake by David Hagen.jpeg

Flowers line the trail on the approach to Frog Lake. Photo (c) David Hagen

Sitting inside the 30,000 acre Columbia National Wildlife Refuge, Frog Lake, and the nearby Crab Creek and Marsh Loop trails provide hours of trail exploration. With basalt views, sagebrush-steppe, rocky cliffs and budding wildflowers you won’t run out of beautiful views to take in—just watch out for ticks!

>> Read more about Frog Lake in WTA’s Hiking Guide

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PUFFER BUTTE

Location: Eastern Washington – Blue Mountains
Distance: 4.4 miles, roundtrip

Puffer Butte by Melanie Harding.jpeg

The spring views from Puffer Butte. Photo by Melanie Harding.

Tucked into the southeast corner of the state, this little trail in Field Spring State Park rewards with big views and solitude. The time to visit for wildflowers is now, when snow melt is feeding the first flush of wildflowers (and before things begin to heat up).

>> Read more about Puffer Butte in WTA’s Hiking Guide

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MIMA MOUNDS

Location: Olympia
Length:
 2.7 miles, roundtrip
Elevation Gain: 10 ft.

Mima Mounds by blamecanada.jpeg

Camas in bloom at Mima Mounds. Photo by blamecanada.

While many wildflowers have roots here, but these mysterious hills are best enjoyed when Washington’s native camas blooms blanket the rolling open landscape. This destination is a good one for families looking to just spend the day outside, and has paved trails for strollers or wheelchairs.

>> Read more about Mima Mounds in WTA’s Hiking Guide

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MILLER PENINSULA-THOMPSON SPIT

Location: Olympic Peninsula — Northern Coast
Length:
 5.0 miles, roundtrip
Elevation Gain: 360 ft.

Miller Peninsula-Thompson Spit by LQSeaton.jpg

Spring flowers on the Miller Peninsula-Thompson Trail. Photo by LQSeaton.

This wooded walk enters a lush ravine lined with remnant old-growth and gives way to an isolated beach with views of Protection Island. There are many miles of trails here — whether you do a meandering route around the area or the more direct 4 miles to the water and back. Additionally, it’s possible to create all sorts of loops as well. If you look closely, you may be able to spot a few wildflowers along the edges of the trail.

>> Read more about Miller Peninsula-Thompson Spit in WTA’s Hiking Guide

Posted on February 22, 2019 at 12:34 am
Becky and Steve Larsen | Category: Just for Fun

Freshen Up Your Home for Spring

Whether you hire an outside professional for help, or tackle the project yourself, now is a great time to get a jump on spring cleaning. Many people wait for warmer temps to start cleaning, but I think most everyone can agree that those weekends would be better spent outdoors, soaking up that sun. So, take some inspiration from the list below to get you started now on freshening up your home for spring.

 

It will only take a few hours to check everything off this list, and you’ll feel so much better enjoying the last few weeks of winter, knowing that when the warmer weather finally comes, you can get outside and really enjoy it!

 

Rotate your mattress. Most mattresses need to be rotated regularly in order to even out the overall wear and prolong the lifespan of your bed. However, keep in mind that Sleep Number and Tempur-Pedic mattresses typically should not be rotated. Always check with your manufacturer for their recommendations on your specific mattress. If you own an older mattress with no pillowtop, it should probably be flipped as well as rotated.

 

Clean your mattress. Strip the mattress of all linens and covers. Start by vacuuming the mattress with the upholstery attachment, paying close attention to crevices and seams. Next, sprinkle baking soda (up to a one-pound box) all over the surface of your mattress. Let this sit for at least an hour, but 24 hours is best. Then go back over your mattress with your vacuum’s upholstery attachment again. If you have a steam cleaner, break it out and go over your whole mattress. The steam will reach further into the mattress than your vacuum is able to, and kills dust mites. *It is generally not recommended to clean memory foam with a steam cleaner.

 

Organize & clean the laundry room. Clean the outside of your washer and dryer; scrape any dried detergent from crevices. Next, clean the inside of the washing machine. Most newer models have a self-cleaning cycle. If you have an older machine that does not have a self-cleaning cycle, run a cycle with hot water and a quart of white vinegar. After it is finished, clean the detergent dispensers, using a vinegar and water solution and a scrubber. If you have a front-loader, be sure to clean the rubber seal on the door. This area is prone to mold growth, so use an all-purpose cleaner or maybe even bleach to get under and around the seal.

Next, organize a bit. Throw away products you never use, replace damaged sorting bins, and don’t forget to clean out the dryer vent to prevent a fire.

 Deep clean the fridge. Twice a year (or more), you should give your fridge a front-to-back, top-down scrubbing. Start by taking everything out and throw away anything that has expired. Next, remove all the shelves and drawers. Put them to soak in a solution of two tablespoons baking soda and one-quart hot water. While they are soaking, wipe down the interior of the fridge with the same solution. Then scrub, rinse and dry the shelves and drawers.

Next, dry the drip pan. Remove the base grill, and pull out the drip pan. If it’s full of water, mop it with paper towels and wash the pan with soapy water. If your drop pan is fixed in place, wrap a cloth around the head of a long-handled brush and use to clean the pan.

Don’t forget the coils. In order to keep your refrigerator running efficiently, unplug it, pull it away from the wall, and use a coil brush or your vacuum’s crevice attachment to clean the condenser coils. This should be done at least twice a year, unless you have pets in the home, and then you should do this three to four times a year.

 Clean out spice cabinet. Throw away all expired spices and seasonings. Not only do these lose taste, they actually harbor mold and bacteria.

 Clean out expired medications & vitamins If you have unused medications, please take them to your local pharmacy for proper disposal.

 Vacuum, wash, or steam window curtains

 Wash window blinds

 Add color to your table. Treat yourself to fresh flowers while waiting for the spring blooms outside.

 

Posted on February 20, 2019 at 12:06 am
Becky and Steve Larsen | Category: Helpful Information, Just for Fun

Edmonds Art Walk – 2019

The FIRST Edmonds Art Walk of the new year is Thursday Jan. 17, 5-8pm!This great community event is the third Thursday of every month, all year long – rain or shine. Join galleries, merchants, neighbors and friends to celebrate the arts and cultivate local vitality. More details at- www.artwalkedmonds.com

 

Posted on January 10, 2019 at 10:59 pm
Becky and Steve Larsen | Category: Just for Fun, Local Communities

5 Alternatives to New Years Resolutions

The pressure to come up with resolutions and improvements always mounts near the end of the year, but everyone knows that statistically speaking, most of us won’t stick to our New Year’s resolutions much past February. So rather than give in to societal pressure, guilt, and feelings of hopelessness, I propose a shift in perspective this year.

Rather than viewing the New Year as catalyst for sweeping lifestyle and character changes, let’s instead take this opportunity to renew our sense of purpose and determination. Here are five ideas to make some positive changes in a different way this year.

  1. Express Gratitude

“Gratitude can transform common days into thanksgivings, turn routine jobs into joy, and change ordinary opportunities into blessings.” -William Arthur Ward. You will be amazed at the ways your life will begin to change simply by expressing gratitude regularly. It will help you maintain a fresh perspective day in and day out, and will help to keep stress at bay. Make a list of all the things you are thankful for in your life, big and small. Take some time to really lean in to this list and reflect on each one. Especially focus on why you are thankful for each of those things.

  1. Create a list of things to look forward to

This goes hand-in-hand with gratitude. What are you looking forward to this year? A vacation, a family member getting married, a new restaurant opening, a new novel or a new season of your favorite show. By focusing on the good things coming your way, it will be easier to keep a positive and hope-filled attitude.

  1. Pick a word for the year

Before the year starts, take some time to look at the big picture of the coming year. Find the theme of what you would like to accomplish or focus on, and chose a theme word to guide you. This will give you clarity and focus. Maybe your word for the year is Intentional. Simplify. Peace. Discipline. Fun. When you have your theme word for the year, share it on oneword365.com

  1. Schedule a quarterly retreat

Life happens, and trying to balance work, family, social life, friends, and other commitments often results in very little time for you. Take some time before the new year starts and schedule yourself a quarterly one-day (or weekend!) retreat to focus on YOU. Remember, if you don’t take care of yourself, you won’t be able to take care of anyone else.

  1. Try a 30-day challenge

A 30-day challenge consists of setting a small goal that can be achieved in 30 days, as well as a small, specific action that you will take each day to achieve that goal. For example:

Declutter: every day for 30 days, choose 3 items to donate, sell, give away or throw away.

Random acts of kindness: every day for 30 days, perform a random act of kindness such as: leaving change in a vending machine; buying the coffee of the person behind you at Starbucks; send a thank you email to a coworker who deserves more recognition. Spreading kindness will always come back to you.

 

Posted on December 10, 2018 at 5:46 am
Becky and Steve Larsen | Category: Just for Fun